Archaea Are Interactive Components of Complex Microbiomes.

Authors:
Christine Moissl-Eichinger, Manuela Pausan, Julian Taffner, Gabriele Berg, Corinna Bang, Ruth A Schmitz
Year of publication:
2017
Volume:
-
Issue:
-
Issn:
0966-842X
Journal title abbreviated:
Trends Microbiol.
Journal title long:
Trends in microbiology
Impact factor:
9.808
Abstract:
Recent findings have shaken our picture of the biology of the archaea and revealed novel traits beyond archaeal extremophily and supposed 'primitiveness'. The archaea constitute a considerable fraction of the Earth's ecosystems, and their potential to shape their surroundings by a profound interaction with their biotic and abiotic environment has been recognized. Moreover, archaea have been identified as a substantial component, or even as keystone species, in complex microbiomes - in the environment or accompanying a holobiont. Species of the Euryarchaeota (methanogens, halophiles) and Thaumarchaeota, in particular, have the capacity to coexist in plant, animal, and human microbiomes, where syntrophy allows them to thrive under energy-deficiency stress. Due to methodological limitations, the archaeome remains mysterious, and many questions with respect to potential pathogenicity, function, and structural interactions with their host and other microorganisms remain.