Diversification of memory B cells drives the continuous adaptation of secretory antibodies to gut microbiota.

Authors:
Cornelia Lindner, Irene Thomsen, Benjamin Wahl, Milas Ugur, Maya K Sethi, Michaela Friedrichsen, Anna Smoczek, Stephan Ott, Ulrich Baumann, Sebastian Suerbaum, Stefan Schreiber, André Bleich, Valérie Gaboriau-Routhiau, Nadine Cerf-Bensussan, Helena Hazanov, Ramit Mehr, Preben Boysen, Philip Rosenstiel, Oliver Pabst
Year of publication:
2015
Volume:
16
Issue:
8
Issn:
1529-2908
Journal title abbreviated:
Nat. Immunol.
Journal title long:
Nature immunology
Impact factor:
24.973
Abstract:
Secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) shields the gut epithelium from luminal antigens and contributes to host-microbe symbiosis. However, how antibody responses are regulated to achieve sustained host-microbe interactions is unknown. We found that mice and humans exhibited longitudinal persistence of clonally related B cells in the IgA repertoire despite major changes in the microbiota during antibiotic treatment or infection. Memory B cells recirculated between inductive compartments and were clonally related to plasma cells in gut and mammary glands. Our findings suggest that continuous diversification of memory B cells constitutes a central process for establishing symbiotic host-microbe interactions and offer an explanation of how maternal antibodies are optimized throughout life to protect the newborn.